Crusader Summer Reading » Crusader- Entering 12th

Crusader- Entering 12th

The designated summer reading books for students entering twelfth grade are:
 
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by the Pearl Poet (Tolkien translation only)
  • History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth
 

The designated summer reading books for students entering twelfth grade AP English are:

  • Dubliners by James Joyce
  • A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  • The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth  
  • Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus
 

These books were included in your book fees at enrollment/re-enrollment and can be picked up in the front office of either campus after enrollment/re-enrollment is complete through Admissions.

 

Students must complete one assignment for each required book. Students in each grade level are required to read two books and complete one assignment per book.  This year students will be given options for creativity with the assignments: traditional, technological or non-technological. To receive full credit, all work must be submitted to the teachers by the first Friday of the school year, August 12, 2022.

 

 

TRADITIONAL OPTION

 

For 7th-12th  grade, the traditional option is annotations. Guidelines must be followed to receive credit for annotations.  If your child prefers to complete the annotations, they DO NOT need to complete the technological or non-technological options offered below. 

 

The annotations will constitute your child’s first English grades of the year. A guide to annotating  with sample illustrations is available below. These books will also be the source of discussion during the first couple of weeks of school.

Information on annotating is posted below with sample illustrations. There should be annotations on each pageShould questions arise about annotations or these instructions, please email Ms. Dugas in the upper school English department ([email protected]).

TECH OPTION
 

(English II, English II Honors, English III, English III Honors,  English IV )

 

It must meet the literary requirements for grade level. *See attached literary requirements.

 

Google Slides

  1. Present required information in a slide presentation using Google Slides
  2. Literary requirements need to be clearly organized and labeled on slides.
  3. Students are encouraged to be as creative as they wish with slide transitions, backgrounds, images, fonts, etc.
  4. The first slide needs to include the book title, author, student’s name, and date completed.
 
 
 
 
NON-TECH OPTION
 

(English II, English II Honors, English III, English III Honors,  English IV )

 

Character Cards

  1. Choose four characters from the novel. On a 3x5 notecard, draw and color the character (one character per card).
  2. Literary requirements will be in essay form. See grade requirements.
  3. Put your name on the BACK of the card where you list your facts.

 

 

 

 

LITERARY REQUIREMENTS

 

 

  • list the title and author
  • Using at least 3 cited (in text and works cited-MLA 9th edition) outside sources, create your own definition of two different literary elements (allegory, allusion, analogy, hyperbole, idiom, imagery, irony, metaphor, motif, oxymoron, paradox, point of view, simile, symbol, theme)
  • Identify 4 examples of each of the chosen elements, explaining how the elements function in the text
  • A minimum of 15 vocabulary words with definitions and a memorable sentence for each
  • 2 biblical themes
  • 1 real-world application

 

 

 

 

AP REQUIREMENTS

 

AP students must annotatewrite a paper (see essay prompts with attached literary requirements for AP English), and create slides for summer reading books. Students must choose one option per summer reading book. All three options must be met, but there can be no overlap. For instance, if you choose annotations for Heart of Darkness, you cannot do annotations for another summer reading book.  If you choose slides for A Tale of Two Cities, you cannot do slides for another summer reading book, etc.

 

For Slides

  • list the title and author
  • Using at least 3 cited (in text and works cited-MLA 9th edition) outside sources, create your own definition of two different literary elements (allegory, allusion, analogy, hyperbole, idiom, imagery, irony, metaphor, motif, oxymoron, paradox, point of view, simile, symbol, theme)
  • Identify 4 examples of each of the chosen elements, explaining how the elements function in the text
  • A minimum of 15 vocabulary words with definitions and a memorable sentence for each
  • 2 biblical themes
  • 1 real-world application

 

 

Choose the prompt that corresponds with the book for which you have chosen to write an essay.

 

Summer Reading Essay Topics

 

1.Tale of Two Cities

  1.  How is local color and imagery used to describe London and Paris?
  2. In Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, does the author show greater sympathy for the aristocrats of France or for the peasantry? Does he demonstrate the same sympathies in his treatment of the social classes of England? Use specific events from the novel to support your conclusion.
  3. Discuss the multiple uses and meanings of the theme of resurrection as it appears in Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities. In what way does this theme link the disparate events of the narrative?

 

2. Heart of Darkness

a. What is the significance of Conrad’s title Heart of Darkness, and how does that  significance reveal itself?

 

3. The History of the Kings of Britain

a. select a significant battle scene and analyze its narrative structure. Discuss how   the narrative serves Monmouth’s patriotic purpose in The History of the Kings of Britain.

b. In what ways does The History of the Kings of Britain both resemble and differ from ancient epics?

Curl Up With a Good Book This Summer!

While we are requiring your child to read two books, we encourage him/her to read all throughout the summer.  Below is a list of grade-level books that your child may enjoy. This will be a great introduction to the reading your child will do throughout the year.
 
  • Emma by Jane Austen
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  • And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens by Sean Covey
  • Unlocked by Karen Kingsbury
  • 21 Great Stories by Abraham Lass
  • The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
  • Perelandra by C.S. Lewis
  • That Hideous Strength by C.S. Lewis
  • In the Grip of Grace by Max Lucado
  • Exodus by Leon Uris
  • A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens